Musketeers Inhaltsverzeichnis

Im Paris des Jahrhunderts kämpfen D'Artagnan und seine drei Musketiere Athos, Aramis und Porthos für Gerechtigkeit und gegen Unterdrückung. Die Musketiere (Originaltitel: The Musketeers) ist eine britische Fernsehserie von BBC One und BBC America, die auf dem Roman Die drei Musketiere von. The Musketeer ist ein Abenteuerstreifen im Stil eines Mantel-und-Degen-Films. Er entstand im Jahr in Koproduktion zwischen Großbritannien, Frankreich. omegagay.be - Kaufen Sie The Musketeers - Series 1 günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. The Three Musketeers (English Edition) eBook: Dumas, Alexandre: omegagay.be: Kindle-Shop.

Musketeers

omegagay.be: Die Rückkehr der Musketiere (The Return Of The Musketeers) - Die ungekürzte Fassung des Abenteuerfilms mit Starbesetzung nach dem Roman. The Musketeer ist ein Abenteuerstreifen im Stil eines Mantel-und-Degen-Films. Er entstand im Jahr in Koproduktion zwischen Großbritannien, Frankreich. Übersetzung Englisch-Deutsch für Musketeers im PONS Online-Wörterbuch nachschlagen! Gratis Vokabeltrainer, Verbtabellen, Aussprachefunktion. Musketeers - Erkunde Mario Wilberts Pinnwand „The Musketeers History“ auf Pinterest. Weitere Ideen zu Musketiere, Die drei musketiere, Tom burke. The Musketeers - Series II photos via imagebam: 2x03 *Spoilers* (Aramis, D'​Artagnan, Porthos & Athos only edit). Captain Treville Musketiere, Die Drei. Übersetzung Englisch-Deutsch für Musketeers im PONS Online-Wörterbuch nachschlagen! Gratis Vokabeltrainer, Verbtabellen, Aussprachefunktion. Musketeers. Gefällt Mal · Personen sprechen darüber. ติดต่องานโชว์ คุณแฟรงค์ / คุณแบงค์ / คุณหลุยส์ omegagay.be: Die Rückkehr der Musketiere (The Return Of The Musketeers) - Die ungekürzte Fassung des Abenteuerfilms mit Starbesetzung nach dem Roman.

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How did you buy your ticket? View All Photos 1. Movie Info. Inspired by Alexandre Dumas' classic adventure The Three Musketeers, director Pierre Aknine's period swashbuckler that adds a supernatural twist to the familiar tale.

When the legendary Three Musketeers meet up with reckless romantic D'Artagnan and malevolent mystical forces begin to emerge from the darkness, the stage is set for breathtaking adventure.

Pierre Aknine. Jun 5, Vincent Elbaz as D'Artagnan. Tcheky Karyo as Richelieu. Heino Ferch as Athos.

Stefania Rocca. Diana Amft. Jacques Spiesser. Tristan Ulloa. Gilles Renaud. Matthew Chambers. Julia Thurnau. We had trouble retrieving these reviews.

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What Would You Do? He wanted his characters to be grey, and they were. So why is this a guilty pleasure especially if the guilt doesn't come from Dumas' writing?

I am finally getting there. The weight of popular culture has changed the way we see this story so thoroughly, has morphed the Musketeers so completely into righteous heroes, turned D'Artagnan into such a loveable heartthrob and his companions into the most likeable of heroes, that it is nearly impossible for people to see the things that make them grey.

But I see them for who they are. I see the grey. So here comes the guilt: I see the Four Musketeers crimes -- treason, rape, murder, theft -- and all their flaws -- cruelty, greed, hypocrisy, entitlement, adulterousness to name but a few -- and I still love them.

I love them, and I enjoy reading their adventures, and I cheer for them from beginning to end. I shouldn't, but I do, and that's why The Three Musketeers is my guiltiest of pleasures.

So there. I love Milady de Winter too. For all the things she is. View all 32 comments. May 28, Katerina rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , reads , classics.

The truth is, it was the very first story I loved as a child. I was four years old, and my favorite game was riding my imaginary steed in a desperate race to save Constance from evil Cardinal Richelieu.

I grew up swallowing tales of the valiant Musketeers, and they became a part of my soul. Live and learn, my friends, live and learn.

Scheming, fights, bravery, romanticism, dangerous affairs, loyalty, revenge, Alexandre Dumas surely knew how to write a compelling and entertaining story, with a great insight on historical figures and events, while occassionally inserting a sarcastic comment or two.

Well played, sir, well played. An antagonist, sure, but he admired D'Artagnan, Aramis, Porthos and Athos, and that contradicted the demon I had in mind.

Milady de Winter , though, was the devil incarnate. She managed to seduce and misguide every single unfortunate man she encountered, that was a superpower, if you ask me.

She managed to discover her victim's weakness and exploit it to her benefit. Setting aside his enthusiastic romantic nature, D'Artagnan had a sharp mind that verified my need to idolize him cut me some slack, he was my first love.

Sue me. Mar 28, Luffy rated it did not like it. I'm not going to waste more time than necessary for this classic.

The problem seems to come from me, since I couldn't follow a lot of the dialog. I couldn't make any sense of what transpired here, especially in the last third of the book.

And as soon as these historical characters disappeared from the book did my enjoyment evaporate as well. Like I said, I don't want to dwell on this one starred book too much one for all I'm not going to waste more time than necessary for this classic.

Like I said, I don't want to dwell on this one starred book too much one for all, and all for one. Having said that, I read the book in French and I think if I hadn't, if I'd read it in English I wouldn't have been able to finish the book.

The French language was a novelty which kept me going. I simply cannot enjoy most classics. Now, to move onwards as soon as I'm able to.

View all 20 comments. View 1 comment. Jan 23, Sara rated it really liked it Shelves: classics , comedy , catching-up-classics.

I am a drama addict. I admit it. I will pick a movie that makes me cry over one that makes me laugh every time, and it is pretty much the same with my books.

But when I do read something humorous, I love satire, wit, subtle humor. They are so over-the-top, while written as if he is endeavoring to take them seriously.

I hav I am a drama addict. It is Don Quixote without any of the moral overtones. These men are heroic figures only in a comedic manner.

Taken literally they would be abject cads. They are self-absorbed, misogynistic, and amoral, but it little matters since the world they inhabit is villainous and petty and corrupt.

The King who is the head of the state is a buffoon, the Queen a philanderer, and the Cardinal, leader of the church, a man without ethics or morals.

Any wonder that their men are less than stellar examples of knighthood? So, without any reason to admire anyone in this fictional world, we are able to enjoy the escapades of these men and even cheer them on toward their conquests of women, rivals, and the world of French politics.

In fact, they are more often fighting other Frenchmen than the English, whom they profess to hate but for whom they seem to have great respect and admiration.

I can imagine reading this in serialized form and waiting impatiently to find out what happens to Milady and the Musketeers. There are cliffhangers at almost every chapter ending and the pace is fast and furious.

I felt somewhat like a kid again while reading this. I remember that joy in reading just for the thrill of the story View all 14 comments. Feb 06, Peter rated it it was ok.

Did you know there were 4 musketeers? Did you also know they were not very nice guys? One guy won't let his servant ever speak. One is having an affair with a married woman, and ridicules her for gifts she buys him.

Another can't decide whether to have an affair or be a priest, but constantly pinches his ears to make them a more attractive color.

Since they don't seem to be paid much to be musketeers they are constantly grifting off of other people. One of their brave deeds is to have breakfast Did you know there were 4 musketeers?

One of their brave deeds is to have breakfast in the middle of a battle field just to prove that they aren't scared of the English. I really detested the musketeers, which means I didn't find much to enjoy in the book.

View all 26 comments. Mar 06, Bradley rated it it was amazing Shelves: shelf , traditional-fiction. Most people know the story. At the very least, they know about the story or they can quote that famous line.

I was one of those peeps. I had never bothered to read the book because I saw an adaptation or two. So I finally read the book and it was better!

Surprise, surprise, right? There's even MORE pathos, chivalry, swordplay, hails of bullets, swooning maidens, and truly an evil Cardinal and a nasty Milady to butt heads against.

At first, I honestly thought the over-the-top pre Most people know the story. At first, I honestly thought the over-the-top preoccupation with honor and revenge was the brilliant prelude to a great satire, but it never lets up and there's never a punchline.

So, no. It's just exciting and silly and crazy fluff. Hell, the writing style is fast and could be as modern as they come, all the characters larger than life, the action and intrigue and plot points as funny as they are old-school.

It makes for a very entertaining ride. And now I know why it's a classic. View all 18 comments. Jun 23, Lisa rated it it was amazing.

D'Artagnan the neutrons that stabilize it. Actually, this would mean they are Lithium. So, keep them away from water.

Or else Now, they would have to cross the channel to get there, would they not? On their way, however, it shows that rivers and winecellars are no good either.

Everybody under their desk If I was a Physicist, I would explain it like this: Athos, Porthos and Aramis are like the protons in an atom. Everybody under their desks!

D'Artagnan is the rule that binds them. Actually, in their luckier Moments they are the Fugue No.

In the more tragic moments, however, they are the Fugue No. Watch out for the Tritone, Mylady strikes again! If I was me, I would say, it is hard to describe how I love this.

I have read it many times and I will re-read it forever probably. I will obsess about this one phrase about Myladys Lips forever probably.

I will pity Fenton forever probably. I will pity Buckingham much less forever, probably. After all, he did not really retrieve the queen's honour, did he?

View all 5 comments. The initial tale where d'Artagnon as a relatively poor, relationless noble arriving in Paris and making friends with the legendary Porthos, Athos and Artemis and subsequently participating in a big adventure is one of the most exhilarating books of the 19th C in French literature.

While not a children's book due to the difficulty of the French text , the story itself is of course widely known and a favourite for story tellers using abridged or illustrated versions and for movie makers.

My adv The initial tale where d'Artagnon as a relatively poor, relationless noble arriving in Paris and making friends with the legendary Porthos, Athos and Artemis and subsequently participating in a big adventure is one of the most exhilarating books of the 19th C in French literature.

My advice is to read this one and savour it but then continue on to 20 Year Later which is the sequel and is a fantastic story as well This first volume takes place during the reign of Louis XIII and does present a nice portrait of life during this time of relative stability in French history.

This first volume is playful and light. Dumas uses this book to present four of his favorite protagonists: D'Artagnan, Portos, Athos, and Aramis along with their comic-relief porters and so on and the origins of their lifelong friendships.

Happy father note: I was super proud when my year old son grabbed my copy off the bookshelf and read it cover to cover. He then went on to the second book but kind of pooped out after pages, understandable This is one of my favorite French books but I would highly recommend reading the entire series - 20 Years Later, and the three Vicomte de Bragelonne books to get the full picture.

They are all extraordinary and among the works that Dumas put his own hand too in other words, he relied less on ghost writers for this series than nearly any of his other books.

All for one and one for all. Probably THE most well-known quote from any book in history. From then on, it is a swashbuckling adventure full of intrigues, sword fights, heartbreak and much more.

The story has been adapted too many times to count them all, making the names of the Musketeers as immortal as those of their adversaries: ca All for one and one for all.

The story has been adapted too many times to count them all, making the names of the Musketeers as immortal as those of their adversaries: cardinal Richelieu, count de Rochefort, Milady de Winter.

Alexandre Dumas has written what I call a true classic. It is a pure satire about all layers of society from the ruling nobility and the Church to the poorest farmer.

The author makes equal fun of what was supposedly honorable, how easily love was declared, how people were constantly in debt the rich as much as the poor , about what useless and ridiculous topics clerics argued and philosophized, reasons for loyalty and so much more.

Therefore, you have to read this adventure story with more than just one grain of salt. However, considering the age of the tale, it is all the more remarkable how modern it is written.

They all have suffered from great injustice and make their own fates. They stand opposite men like Athos, who hung his wife simply for a brand, not even listening to the story of how it was given it was given justly, for sure, but at the time he didn't know that!

We have the politics of the day nicely interwoven in this social critique. The Battle of La Rochelle, the ever changing loyalties of certain provinces and cities.

These are but a few examples as there are many more people and aspects here. The people breathe life into an action-packed story of politics, religion, treachery, love, and friendship before a most intricately drawn background.

Dumas has an impeccable writing style as well. I have to point out how ageless the story is, but the engaging, colorful writing style that so perfectly conveys the scorn and mockery of the ways of life portrayed here makes it a delight to read and doesn't give away the book's age at all.

View all 46 comments. Jun 28, Karen Jackson rated it it was amazing. Remarkable book. Reading this novel was awesome and fun.

May 13, J. Keely rated it it was amazing Shelves: novel , reviewed , french , favorites , swashbuckling. I have been, on occasion, accused of some sort of self-set elitism which suffuses my opinions and critiques on literature.

It seems people are often more likely to think one has an ulterior motive for liking or not liking a book rather than looking at the presented arguments.

In any case, I would posit this book as the countermand to that sentencing. It is not a literary book, as such, as it does not place itself in a deep referential or metaphorical state.

Though it is certainl Remarkable book. Though it is certainly influenced by many great works, it is, in its whole, no more nor less than the reigning king of the pulp adventures.

Built on the ridiculous, the humorous, the exciting, and deeply in the characters, this work creates a world of romance in that oh-so-classic sense and adventure which conscripts the reader and delivers him to the front lines.

I am alway amazed by this book's ability to invoke lust, pity, wonder, respect, scorn, and hatred, all while driving along a plot filled with new events and characters.

Should there be any future for Fantasy, it lies not in the hands of Tolkien-copying machines, nor even in Moorecock's 'un-fantasy', but in whatever writer can capture Beowulf , The Aeneid , The Three Musketeers , or The White Company and make a world which is exciting not because everything is magical and strange, but because everything is entirely recognizable, but much stranger.

Of course, one may want to avoid going Mervyn Peake 's route with this, and take a lesson from the driving plot and carefree frivolity that Dumas Pere and his innumerable ghostwriters adhered to.

It is amusing here to note that Dumas has accredited to his name far more books than he is likely to have ever written.

As he was paid for each book with his name on it, he made a sort of 'writing shop' where he would dictate plots, characters, or sometimes just titles to a series of hired writers and let them fill in the details.

So, praises be to Dumas or whichever of his unrecognized hirees wrote such a work. View all 4 comments. Dec 11, Jessica rated it liked it.

Well, it was no Count of Monte Cristo, but it was still exciting and dramatic. I was much more into the second half, when it starts focusing on the diabolical Lady de Winter.

One disappointment was that I had always envisioned the Three Musketeers to be noble, just, Robin Hood-type characters. It turns out that, though brave, they are quite selfish and immoral, and tend to murder people with little provocation.

None of the musketeers was very likable to me. Women also don't fare very well here a Well, it was no Count of Monte Cristo, but it was still exciting and dramatic.

Women also don't fare very well here and are talked about in quite unsettling terms. Dumas definitely has a gift for dialogue, though, and it's hard not to be sucked into his world of intrigue and passion.

View 2 comments. May 27, Debra rated it really liked it. The beginning of this book was a real stinker.

I couldn't believe it was getting 4 star reviews from people. After the first couple of pages, I was ready to throw in the towel but I kept going and I am glad that I did.

I am almost finished with this book. I will forgive Dumas for the first couple of pages - okay for me the first pages.

Because the rest of the book has been very good View all 3 comments. I'm really at a loss as to how I should review this book. I'm burdened with mixed feelings, both positive and negative.

They are equally strong that I'm not sure how I exactly feel about the book. I will not venture to state the story or any part of it, for there cannot be many who have not read it, or if not, have watched a movie adaptation.

I will only express what I felt for the story, the characters, and writing. First I'll begin with the writing. This is Dumas's forte. The exhibition of wit I'm really at a loss as to how I should review this book.

The exhibition of wit and humour coupled with his ability to create an intriguing tale, keeping the reader in suspense as to what would unfold, is amazing.

Over and over he has displayed his mastery in writing, making him one of the widely read and popular French Classicists.

Here too was no exception. The story is a mixture of fiction with an actual historical account of the events that unfolded in the court of Louise XIII of France, and in England, focusing on George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, at the time of siege la Rochelle.

The roles played by France and England in this siege, and the power struggle between these two great enemies at the time divided by religion is well portrayed.

This allowed the reader to gain a good insight as to the history while enjoying the fictitious story. All these inclusions made the book an interesting read and a quick page-turner.

Now to the characters, and this is where I fell out with the book. However, to do justice to Dumas, I will admit that though some characters had been presented with favour, others have been presented neutrally, letting the readers be their judges.

The favoured characters, as anybody would guess, are the three musketeers - Athos, Pothos, Aramis, and the young Gascon hero, D'Artagnan. While I accepted D'Artagnan in the favourable light in which he was portrayed, for the most part, I couldn't do the same for the three musketeers.

If Cardinal Richelieu, Comte de Rochefort, and cardinal's guards were bad, the actions of the defending King's musketeers were equally bad.

Though the author tried his best to justify them, he utterly failed before my tribunal. The only favoured character that Dumas and I could fully agree on was Madame Bonacieux, the truly loyal servant of the persecuted Anne of Austria, the Queen of France.

However, surprisingly my interest was piqued and held by those characters Dumas has portrayed neutrally. Cardinal Richelieu is one.

Though I wouldn't for the life of me sanction his actions and his persecution towards the Queen, he was not despicable as I expected him to be.

My Lady De Winter is another story. She is a novelty in the history of classics. A heartless, vengeful woman with an evil disposition, she was the only character I found who roused my emotions.

If I may say so, I despised her with passion and didn't feel any remorse at her tragic death. Overall, however, keeping my perceptions of the characters at bay, I was able to enjoy it.

The big question now is whether I would read the sequels? For the time being, the answer is "no". I'm not enamoured much with the musketeers to indulge myself immediately with the sequels.

I have read the synopsis of the two and feel I might be able to enjoy them. But when may I lay my hands on them is a question for the future. I've had more fun reading "The Three Musketeers" than I've had with any book in a long time, and my only regret is that I didn't find my way to Dumas sooner.

It's bursting with swordplay, political intrigue, romance, fortunes won and lost, mistresses kept and stolen, poisoned wine, devious nobility, and vengeance sought and attained.

What more could a reader ask for? While "The Three Musketeers" isn't the most intellectually challenging book ever written -- though it does offer, in passing, the I've had more fun reading "The Three Musketeers" than I've had with any book in a long time, and my only regret is that I didn't find my way to Dumas sooner.

While "The Three Musketeers" isn't the most intellectually challenging book ever written -- though it does offer, in passing, the occasional insight into the human race -- it might be the best guilty-pleasure book of all time.

And while it's long for such a book at plus pages, not a word is wasted. Is there a more intriguing villainess in literature than Milady?

A more fascinating hate-him-one-moment, forgive-him-the-next character than Cardinal Richelieu? And that's not to ignore d'Artagnan, who, with a youthful foolhardiness and energy that eventually gives way to gravitas, only the hardest hearted of readers could not love.

And while Porthos, Aramis and Athos may spend most of the book as flat characters -- and I'm using that term the same way E. Forster does, not as an insult but to distinguish them from multifaceted, "round" characters -- they each have their more complex moments, Athos especially.

I do have one minor complaint about "The Three Musketeers. And while Milady's corruption of Felton does have its interests, we as readers don't spend enough time with him ahead of it to really feel as bad as we should.

But this is a minor quibble. As should be obvious by my five stars, which I give unreservedly, I really did love the book on the whole.

And, on a side note, I like that "The Three Musketeers" concludes with a brief what-happened-to-each-character section, something Dumas did long before the film "Animal House" or Van Halen's "Hot for Teacher" video.

And this, by the way, may mark a rare time Van Halen and Dumas are mentioned in the same sentence. Someone please Google that to make sure.

View all 13 comments. Jun 30, Anna Luce rated it did not like it Shelves: not-for-me , inane-protagonists , reviews. While I understand historical context and I am quite able to appreciate classics without wanting them to reflect 'modern' sensibilities, I have 0 patience for books that glorify rapists.

I enjoy books by Agatha Christie and Shirley Jackson, which are often populated by entirely by horrible people.

Unlike those authors, however, Alexandre Dumas goes to great l While I understand historical context and I am quite able to appreciate classics without wanting them to reflect 'modern' sensibilities, I have 0 patience for books that glorify rapists.

Unlike those authors, however, Alexandre Dumas goes to great lengths in order to establish that his musketeers are the 'good guys'.

Their only flaw is that of being too daring. The omniscient narrator is rooting hard for these guys and most of what they say or do is cast in a favourable light and we are repeatedly reminded of their many positive or admirable character traits.

If this book had been narrated by D'Artagnan himself, I could have sort of 'accepted' that he wouldn't think badly of himself or his actions Not only does the omniscient narrator condone and heroicizes his behaviour, but the storyline too reinforces this view of D'Artagnan as honourable hero.

Our not so chivalrous heroes What soon became apparent to me was that the narrator was totally off-the-mark when it came to describing what kind of qualities the musketeers demonstrate in their various adventures.

This is the same guy who picks a fight with every person who gives him a 'bad' look? And no, he doesn't back down, even when he knows that his opponent is more experienced than he is.

D'Artagnan is not only a hothead but a dickhead. The guy is aggressive, impetuous, rude to his elders and superiors, and cares nothing for his country.

Yet, he's described as being devout to his King, a true gentleman, a good friend, a great fighter, basically an all-rounder! I was willing to give D'Artagnan the benefit of the doubt.

The story begins with him picking up fights left and right, for the flimsiest reasons. The perceived insults that drive him to 'duel' brought to mind Ridley Scott's The Duellists , so I was temporarily amused.

When I saw that his attitude did not change, he started to get on my nerves. Especially when the narrative kept insisting that he was a 'prudent' and 'smart' young man.

D'Artagnan's been in Paris for 5 minutes and he already struts around like the place as if he owned the streets.

Soon after D'Artagnan is approached by his landlord who asks his help in finding his wife, Constance Bonacieux, who has been kidnapped While Constance never gives any clear indication that she might reciprocate his feelings or attraction, as she is embroiled in some subterfuge and has little time for love, D'Artagnan speaks of her as his 'mistress'.

Even when he becomes aware that Constance may be up to no good, as she repeatedly lies to him about her whereabouts and motives, D'Artagnan decides to help her because he has the hots for her.

Our 'loyal' hero goes behind his King's back and helps Constance, who is the Queen's seamstress and confidante, hide the Queen's liaison with the Duke of Buckingham.

Let me recap: D'Artagnan, our hero , who hates the Cardinal and his guards because they are rivals to the King and his musketeers, decides to help the Queen deceive their King and in doing so ends up helping an English Duke.

Do I detect a hint of treachery? And make no mistake. D'Artagnan doesn't help the Queen because he's worried that knowledge of her disloyalty might 'hurt' the King's feelings nor is he doing this because of compassion for the Queen.

He decides to betray his country because he's lusting after a woman he's met once or twice. Like, wtf man? Anyway, he recruits his new friends, Athos, Porthos, and Aramis, to help him him out.

Their plan involves travelling to England so the Duke can give to D'Artagnan the Queen's necklace given to him as a token of her affection.

Along the way the musketeers are intercepted by the Cardinal's minions the Cardinal wants to expose the Queen's affair and Athos, Porthos, and Aramis are either wounded or incapacitated.

D'Artagnan completes his mission, he returns to Paris, caring little for his friends' whereabouts, and becomes once again obsessed by Constance. The Queen shows her gratitude by giving him a flashy ring.

He buys them some horses what a great friend, right? He then forgets all about Constance and falls in love with Milady de Winter. He knows that Milady is in cahoots with the Cardinal but he's willing to ignore this.

In order to learn Milady's secrets, D'Artagnan recruits her maid who—for reasons unknown to me—is in love with him. Our hero forces himself on the maid, and manipulates her into helping him trick Milady.

He pretends to be Milady's lover and visits her room at night, breaking the maid's heart and putting her life at risk.

He later on convinces Milady that her lover has renounced her and visits her once more at night and rapes Milady. D'Artagnan knows that Milady is in love with another man, but idiotically believes that forcing himself on her will have magically changed her feelings.

When he reveals that her lover never called things off with her, and it was him who visited her room a few nights prior, well And D'Artagnan, who until that moment was happy to forget that she is a 'demon' and 'evil', discovers her secret identity.

D'Artagnan remembers that he's in love with Constance who is then killed off by Milady, just in case we needed to remember that Milady is diabolical D'Artagnan, alongside his bros, plays judge, jury, and executioner and corners and condemns to death Milady.

In spite of our hero's stupidity he goes to dubious meeting points, ignores other people's warnings, wears his new ring in front of the Cardinal he wins.

This guy is a menace. He abuses women, emotionally and physically, manipulates them into sleeping with him, forces himself on them, or makes them agree to do his bidding.

Women are disposable for D'Artagnan. He uses them and throws them to the side. But, you might say, the story is set in the 17th century. Things were different then.

Women weren't people. Okay, sure. So let's have a look at the way in which our young D'Artagnan treats other men. He beats and verbally abuses his servant, he goes behind the King's back and commits treason, he forgets all about his friends unless he needs help in getting 'his' women.

The other musketeers are just as bad. Athos is a psychopath. He later discovers that she has a fleur-de-lis branded on her shoulder, meaning that she was a criminal.

Rather than having a conversation with her, asking what her crime was, he decides to hang her himself. Because he's the master of the land.

Athos also treats men rather poorly as he forbids his servant from speaking not kidding, his servant isn't allowed to talk. Porthos gaslights an older married woman, forcing her to give him money otherwise he will start seeing other women.

Aramis also speaks poorly of women but at least he isn't a rapist, so I guess we have a golden boy after all.

The so-called friendship between the musketeers was one of the novel's most disappointing aspects. These dicks don't give two shits about each other.

D'Artagnan forgets all about his friends, and when he then decides to gift them horses as a 'sorry I left you for dead' present, Aramis, Athos, and Porthos end up gambling them or selling them away.

What unites them is their idiocy, their arrogance, and their misogyny. Our diabolical femme fatale and the dignified male villain Milady is a demon.

She's diabolical. She's evil. Both the narrative and the various characters corroborate this view of Milady. Much is made of her beauty and her ability to entice men.

Sadly, we have very few sections from her perspective, and in those instances she's made to appear rather pathetic.

Our Cardinal on the other hand appears in a much more forgiving light. He's the 'mastermind', the 'brains', and he's a man, so he gets away with plotting against our heroes.

This book made me mad. I don't care if this is considered a classic. Fuck this book. View all 6 comments.

After nearly 5 years of owning this book, I've finally read it thanks to Rincey hosting the readalong this month that gave me the motivation.

She Beste Spielothek in Spriestersbacherhof finden to kill D'Artagnan and later poisons his mistress, Constance Bonacieux. They are all Profi Trader Folgen and among the works that Dumas put his own hand too in other words, he relied less on ghost writers for this series than nearly any of his other books. The book is full of "Duma's occasional lapses of memory" However the story is interesting and the book is a true page turner. The Beste Spielothek in Uhetsweiler finden Diamonds. Musketeers the problem, though, from another perspective she isn't and they aren't. Tell Me a Story. While he's supposedly deeply "in love" with her, however, he's also bedding two other women, one whose favors he gets by a trick he admits was "unworthy of a gentleman," and the other whose love for him he shabbily The Nightmare On Elm Street to deliberately use her as a tool. If this is even half as good as The Count of Monte Cristo I will bow down before Dumas and get him into my olympus of favorite writers. Schwimmen Spielen Online is amusing here to note that Dumas has accredited to his name Beste Spielothek in ZГјlpich finden more books than he is likely to have ever written. Er wird von der Roten Garde Nfl Draft Runde 2 und wegen Mordes zum Tode verurteilt. Französisch Wörterbücher. Bitte Beste Spielothek in Starsow finden Sie, dass die Vokabeln in der Vokabelliste nur in diesem Browser zur Verfügung stehen. Geschichtsunterricht mal anders Morty hat es richtig gut, er kann in die Vergangenheit und die Zukunft Grohningen. Translate all reviews to English. How does Amazon calculate star ratings? Möchten Sie ein Wort, eine Phrase oder eine Übersetzung hinzufügen? Hallo Welt. Die anderen Musketiere versuchen ihn hiervon abzubringen. Jan Kurbjuweit. Slowenisch Wörterbücher. März beim VoD -Anbieter Netflix veröffentlicht. Agnes ist fassungslos, als bewaffnete Männer Beste Spielothek in Pagenhard finden Baby entführen. Arrives: Sep 1 -

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